Salem-Keizer Public Schools Seeks Community Input on School Boundary Adjustments at Dec. 4 Listening Sessions

Links to surveys on Task Force Proposal #4 can be found on the boundary adjustments page.

Parents, students, school neighbors and community members are invited to attend a Boundary Review Task Force Listening Session on Dec. 4 to share feedback on possible school attendance area boundary adjustments.

Boundary adjustments are needed to relieve overcrowding and put to use the new spaces being built in the 2018 bond program. During the boundary review process, all school attendance area boundaries in the Salem-Keizer School District are being reviewed, however not all boundaries will need to be adjusted.

A Boundary Review Task Force made up of community volunteers has been reviewing boundaries and proposing adjustments since early October. The goal of the Task Force is to create a recommendation for the Superintendent for adjusted boundaries that balances school enrollments across the district, prepares schools for future growth, and identifies implications for the 2018 bond program.

Public input is important to helping the Task Force create a proposal for adjusted boundaries. The community is invited to attend a Boundary Review Task Force Listening Session on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018, from 6-8 p.m. at one of four locations:

Kennedy Elementary School

4912 Noren Ave. NE, Keizer
Areas of focus will be Keizer/McNary and West Salem schools, most notably: Claggett Creek and Whiteaker middle schools; Clear Lake, Cummings, Forest Ridge, Gubser, Kalapuya, Keizer, Kennedy, Myers and Weddle elementary schools.

Four Corners Elementary School

500 Elma Ave. SE, Salem
Areas of focus will be North Salem/McKay area schools, most notably: Houck Middle School; Auburn, Chávez, Eyre, Four Corners, Hammond, Hayesville, Lamb, Miller, Swegle and Yoshikai elementary schools.

Waldo Middle School

2805 Lansing Ave. NE, Salem
Areas of focus will be McKay/North Salem area schools, most notably: North Salem High School; Parrish Middle School; Hallman, Hoover and Washington elementary schools.

Judson Middle School

4512 Jones Road SE, Salem
Areas of focus will be South/Sprague area schools, most notably: South Salem and Sprague high schools; Bush, Battle Creek, Candalaria, Lee, Liberty, McKinley, Morningside, Salem Heights and Schirle elementary schools.

Parents and community members from all school neighborhoods are welcome to attend; attendance is not limited to residents of the school neighborhoods listed.

The presentations at Four Corners and Waldo will be co-presented in English and Spanish. Additionally, Spanish interpreters will be available at all locations. Childcare and snacks will be provided.

Please contact SKPS at (503) 399-3290 for other accommodations, such as ASL interpretation, at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting.

Expresa tu opinión sobre los ajustes de los límites escolares

Familias del distrito escolar de Salem-Keizer, el próximo 4 de diciembre se llevarán a cabo sesiónes informativas para la comunidad acerca de los ajustes de límites a las escuelas del distrito. Sus hijos podrían ser asignados a diferentes escuelas el próximo año, dependiendo de donde usted vive. Su asistencia es importante, tendrá la oportunidad de expresar su opinión sobre los ajustes de límites escolares con los miembros del grupo de trabajo. Se proporcionarán bocadillos y cuidado de niños. Tendremos interpretes disponibles en español.

SESIÓNES INFORMATIVAS 4 de dec., 6 a 8 p.m.

Esquela Primaria Kennedy

4912 Noren Ave. NE, Keizer
Las áreas de enfoque serán en las escuelas de Keizer y West Salem, en particular: las escuelas intermedias Claggett Creek y Whiteaker; escuelas primarias de Clear Lake, Cummings, Forest Ridge, Gubser, Keizer, Kennedy y Weddle.

Esquela Primaria Four Corners

500 Elma Ave. SE, Salem
Las áreas de enfoque serán las escuelas del área de North Salem/McKay, en particular: Esquela Intermedia Houck; escuelas primarias de Auburn, Chávez, Eyre, Four Corners, Hammond, Hayesville, Lamb, Miller, Swegle y Yoshikai.

Esquela Intermedia Waldo

2805 Lansing Ave. NE, Salem
Las áreas de enfoque serán las escuelas del área McKay/North Salem, en particular: Esquela Preparatoria North Salem; Escuela Intermedia Parrish; escuelas primarias Hallman, Hoover y Washington.

Esquela Intermedia Judson

4512 Jones Road SE, Salem
Las áreas de enfoque serán las escuelas del área South/Sprague, en particular: las escuelas preparatorias South Salem y Sprague; escuelas primarias de Bush, Candalaria, Lee, Liberty, McKinley, Morningside, Salem Heights y Schirle.

TODOS SON BIENVENIDOS

Expresar su opinión sobre los ajustes de límites escolares con los miembros del grupo de trabajo.
https://salkeiz.k12.or.us/boundary-adjustments/

2018-12-13T11:09:25-08:00November 30, 2018|

Tech Talk

There are so many reasons why for many youth screen time has crowded out activities and interactions that would benefit them—in other words, why they are experiencing excessive screen time.

One of the reasons is the inner discomfort that many parents (and teachers) feel from saying “no” to their children and teens. Saying no and being able to tolerate the myriad of emotions that result, such as guilt, self-doubt, and sadness is challenging for many people. On top of that, the child may add on their own negative emotions to the “no,” such as anger and disgust. Having to tolerate any one of these emotions, let alone several of them at one time, is a major undertaking.

Perhaps you have been wanting to set new limits, such as saying “no” to screen time in the car, “no” to screens in the bedroom at bedtime, “no” to screens at the dinner table. I will give some tips below but first these insights.

I have thought long and hard about how challenging it is to tolerate the discomfort of setting boundaries and saying no, not only from my viewpoint as a researcher and speaker on tech and parenting but also from my 25 years of practicing medicine. The hardest “no” that health providers are confronted with over and over is a person requesting opioids when the provider does not think the opioids are in the best interest of the patient.

What has frankly shocked me over the past couple of years with the discussions on the causes of the opioid crisis is that I never hear anyone (reporters, authors, policy makers, etc.) bring up the fact that a contributing cause to this crisis is the fact that health care providers often prescribe these medicines because they can’t tolerate the backlash from saying “no.” We hear reasons about how the drug companies told providers that the long-acting opioids were not addicting, about broken health systems, and others, but the human interactions in the providers’ offices are ignored.

In medical school, students learn next to nothing about addiction medicine. This amazed me since so many of the patients I was seeing in the hospital were there due to addictions (lung disease and tobacco, liver disease and alcohol, and so on). I decided to do an elective in addiction medicine and had the good fortune of having an incredible mentor, Dr. Barry Rosen. He would always tell me that, “The surgeon has her tool, a scalpel…my tool is my words.” Watching Barry lead complex dialogues, laden with intense emotions from his patients such as shame, denial, and hope, was true mastery in action.

I went on to do research and short films on doctor-patient communication, opioid requests, and recovery.  In the films I talk about one way to stay compassionate when setting boundaries is to remind oneself that it is the addiction talking (or crying or yelling), and not the person. That person at say 15, or pick any pre-addiction age, would never have thought to themselves “I would love to be a slave to heroin, wouldn’t that be great and how cool to know that I could die each time I use it.”

The real skill of a health provider is in their effective communication to be able to maintain a connection with the person so that along with a “no,” come discussions about why the “no,” collaborative decision making for alternatives and at times conversations about recovery treatment. Daily my heart hurts when I think of all the people and families dealing with an addiction of any type. If you are interested to hear about the many solutions happening around the opioid epidemic, my dear friend Ann Boiko just launched a wonderful podcast series on iTunes called Finding Fixes. I recommend listening to an episode with your teens.

Back to our topic of saying “no” to prevent excessive screen time. Here are some tips.

Prepping to say the “no”

  1. Spend time writing out why you want to set this screen limit so you feel confident that it is an overall positive thing for your child—such as providing undistracted time for better sleep or for them to build in-person relationships.
  2. Remind yourself that there are hundreds of studies that show parenting with love, but with boundaries, leads to the best outcomes (vs. command and control type parenting or a passive parenting style.)
  3. Baby steps are key. Just pick one thing you have wanted to say “no” to and work on that single challenge. Start with the easiest one.
  4. Know that you are modeling to your children, students, girl scouts, etc. the deeply important skill of “acting with integrity.” If you really believe, as I do, that having times undistracted by devices is good for youth (and all of us), then you are showing them that you are willing to act in line with your beliefs even though it means stepping into discomfort.

Fostering autonomy

Achieving greater autonomy as one enters adulthood is a primary human need. Whenever possible give your child some agency around the “no.” For example, you realize that you think that it is more beneficial to your 13-year old that devices, including the phone, no longer be in her room at bedtime. You do the steps above and now want to appeal to her need for some control. Ask something like, “What time are you thinking the phone should be put away? Should I come and get it or should you give to me at that time?”

Holding person accountable

One of the biggest gifts we give is holding people we care about accountable for their actions. It takes energy to do this and yet payoffs are well worth it. So know as you do the work to enforce the “no” that you are giving a gift, one of energy and dedication. In an upcoming TTT, I will talk more about accountability and consequences.

For today’s Tech Talk Tuesday here are some questions to open a conversation around “no.”

  1. As always start a conversation about the positives of tech such as what cool tech activity grabs everyone’s attention the strongest these days.
  2. If your child currently has any devices with them in the bedroom at bedtime, ask the reasons they like having your devices in their room with them.
  3. What time do they think is a reasonable time to put devices away, out of their room?
  4. Discuss other possible “no” situations related to screens that you may wish to create.
2018-11-28T12:53:22-08:00November 28, 2018|

Salem-Keizer Public Schools to Host Native American Awareness Gathering

The free event features storytelling, dancing, dinner and more!

There are nearly 700 students in Salem-Keizer Public Schools (SKPS) who identify as Native American or Alaska Natives from 65 tribes, and on Friday, Nov. 30, they will be celebrated through native music, dancing, storytelling and a special native dinner. November is Native American Heritage Month, and this gathering is the culmination of a month-long celebration that also included a proclamation from the Salem-Keizer Board of Directors.

The event is open to the public and will be held from 6-9 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 30 at Chemeketa Community College Building 2, 4000 Lancaster Drive NE, Salem. SKPS employees who attend may receive three professional development credits. The gathering is hosted by the Indian Education Program and the Indian Parent Advisory Committee.

The SKPS Indian Education Program provides services for students who identify as Native American or Alaska Natives including tutoring, college and scholarship information, the Eagle Feather Graduation Celebration, monthly meetings for parents and a culturally based academic summer program.

What: Native American Awareness Gathering
When: 6-9 p.m., Friday, Nov. 30, 2018
Where: Chemeketa Community College Building 2, 4000 Lancaster Drive NE, Salem
Cost: Free

2018-11-29T14:53:09-08:00November 18, 2018|

Enrichment Academy Fall Session

What is the After-School Enrichment Academy?

In collaboration with Salem Keizer Education Foundation (SKEF) Crossler Middle School offers the after-school Enrichment Academy (EA).

 

EA programs inspire and encourage kids in learning, keep them safe and help working families. When we help children develop relationships with caring adults and engage families in their schools, we are helping them build a solid foundation for their future growth and development.

 

Expectations:

Enrichment Academy is a great opportunity for your student to expand in their learning and creativity in a safe and monitored environment with professional and caring staff.

*Cost is only $20.00 for this session. Please make checks out to SKEF.

*Students must check-in by 2:45pm.

*We must have a minimum of five (5) students in a Zone or Club or it may be cancelled.

*Students are to be picked up or walk home, as designated above, NO LATER THAN 4:00pm.

*USDA suppers will be provided for everyone under the age of 18. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

*Students engaging in inappropriate behavior may be sent home or removed from the program per program staff decision.

2018-12-18T08:55:42-08:00November 13, 2018|

Tech Talk

Teenage years bring a lot of firsts. For most, it means the first date, first kiss, first job and perhaps first time driving a car. It’s the time when schoolyard crushes turn into romantic relationships and, for the teens of today, social media often plays a big role.

Flirting can happen via text, Snapchat, and other platforms. According to a study by the Pew Research Center, 63% of teens with dating experience have sent flirtatious messages to someone they like, and 14% of teens without dating experience have done so.

Often teens will say things online such as “hey you are cute” and other compliments. Teens tell me that they would not say these things face-to-face but online it is fun. Often a person can tell someone is interested just by whether they send a Snapchat or a direct text (a direct text carries more weight).

Clearly, tweens and teens might not have any interest in discussing flirting with their parents. But I believe that talking about the pressure that can come along with, or masquerade as flirting, is important. Masquerading is when a person is more interested in “hooking up” than they are getting to know someone better and moving toward a relationship. (The term “hooking up” is ambiguous, it includes anything from kissing to sex. Unfortunately, the clearer term “making out” no longer exists).

The Pew study examined the extent to which not all flirting behavior is appreciated or appropriate. Thirty-five percent of teen girls surveyed had blocked or unfriended someone who was flirting in a way that made them uncomfortable, which is double the 16% of boys who had taken that step. And 10% of teens who were in a relationship reported their partner used the internet to pressure them to engage in unwanted sexual activity.

Even though teens may be well-versed in using and communicating via text messaging and social media, they surely have things to contemplate regarding relationships—we all do.

Discussing personal issues with youth (and, yes, their social world does feel very personal to them) can be nerve-wracking for parents. This national survey should give you gusto. It found that kids age 10-15 are ready to talk about tough issues before their parents are, including the issue of being pressured into sexual activity.

Putting on my “curious cap,” and gripping it tightly, is my most effective way of approaching topics on relationships with my teens, which includes what is appropriate to do on social media. When I find wanting to chime in with “don’t do this” and “do that,” I cover my mouth with my imaginary cap because I know such phrases will shut my teens down. When I lead with my “curious cap” on, and ask them questions about what they are seeing, their opinions, etc., often my concerns get raised in a manner that helps my teens come to the conclusions I hoped for. If in the conversation I am not getting the impression that they know the risks of things like begging for photos, sending them (which I have written about in the past) then, by all means, I tell them the risks.

I am continually reminded that when we, as parents, as teachers, as mentors, wear our “curious caps” rather than our judgmental ones, teens are much more likely to come to us when issues arise. Many teens want to turn to key adults in their lives but they will not reach out if they feel the judgment and punishment will be too severe.  

** By the way, I would love your input on upcoming TTTs that I am working on: Do you know of parent groups forming to help prevent excessive screen time? What examples do you know of an adult learning to handle their innate discomfort of saying “no” to children (particularly around excessive screen time)? I have many many more topics up my sleeve, and I always enjoy hearing from you about topics you want to be addressed. So please hit reply and email me.

For this TTT talk with your kids about how they feel using texting and social media in a relationship. (As always start the conversation on a positive note)

  • Do you see any fun flirting happening online?
  • Understanding the meaning behind written words can be hard, do you know examples of when two people were communicating online and one person completely misread the intentions of the other person?
  • Do you know people whose relationships are almost all done via social media?
  • How important is messaging versus spending time together?

Now Available for Educators: A New Professional Development Resource
Thousands of schools around the world have presented Screenagers to their students, staff, and families, and many tell us they are committed to continuing the conversation around supporting screen time balance for their students. Educators can now access the film plus a 3-part Professional Development series developed by Learners Edge and Screenagers to dramatically impact the culture of learning in your school. Request more information about this 6-hour ready-to-use Professional Development module.

We encourage you to go to our website and read through some of the hundreds of past Tech Talk Tuesdays blog posts covering dozens of topics full information and tips. Feel free to share this newsletter with your community and encourage them to sign up for our Tech Talk Tuesday.

2018-11-13T13:34:30-08:00November 13, 2018|